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Convene at CIH 2016

21-Dec-2016 16:30:00

In the last ‘looking back at conferences’ blog for 2016, I chose the first one that took place in a post-Brexit world.

The Chartered Institute of Housing Conference has been running for over 60 years. CIH delivers thought provoking and inspiring content, essential networking, and an unrivalled experience, throughout what is recognised as the most important 3 days in the housing sector's calendar. 

I have taken the liberty of quoting Helen Taylor’s post, ‘Housing in uncertain times. Report from the 2016 CIH Conference’, to better understand what July 2016 was like.

‘"As could be expected from the timing of the conference (the week following the EU referendum), a lot of the programme, discussions, and mood were impacted by the fallout of the previous week’s ‘Brexit’ vote. The conference began with a panel session featuring political editors from the Observer, the Evening Standard, and Daily Mail. Discussion focused on the role of the media in both sides of referendum campaigning and the impact of the vote on tenants and communities, with Andrew Rawnsley (the Observer) arguing that concerns around immigration are often a proxy for other discontents such as housing."

"The impact of the Brexit vote was not yet tangible at the conference, despite dominating much of the discussion. Indeed, the implications remain unclear for the housing sector, housing studies and society more generally. The conference emphasised the importance of ongoing debate and discussion around housing issues, and the value of bringing people in the sector, including the housing studies researcher community, together to do this."

It is human nature to resist change, however as in the case of Brexit a lot has happened in less than six months. Although things are not as clear as we would like them to be, at least there is less uncertainty.

I think this is the same for a digital shift in workplace practices. It takes some time to get used to before it becomes part of everyday life.

With the need to meet, understand and start actioning agendas that minimise any negative impact of Brexit; board members need to have information readily available and be able to review documents on the go, while storing it in a secure location. Until we can assess the implications of Brexit at CIH 2017, why not have a look at how our client, Coastline Housing, implemented Convene and improved their overall productivity?

 

Reminiscing about Brexit as well? Have a listen to our podcast with Peter Crow, where we discussed board level contingency plans in the face of political change.

Lavaniya Das

Written by Lavaniya Das

Lavaniya Das is the Head of UK and EU Content at Azeus Convene UK.